My Letter To Whoever Authorizes DNS Redirects (Sinkholes)

My Letter To Whoever Authorizes DNS Redirects (Sinkholes)


Countermeasures are assumed to be the responsibility of the end-user. If offered, these are considered a value-added service by the ISP, and availability is driven by market forces; they are traditionally offered on a volunteer, or "opt-in," basis, and ISPs are under no legal obligation, as far as I know, to provide such services.

The Internet will be dangerous, or it isn't the internet.

If one is really skydiving one must pack one's own parachute; if one is really surfing there may be a freak wave, or shark; a certain percentage of individuals crossing the street will meet with their demise at the hands of an oncoming vehicle; a certain number of patients undergoing routine surgical procedures will never regain consciousness; healthy individuals in the prime of their lives, described with terms like 'optimistic' 'enthusiastic' or cheerful' by those few last known to encounter them, have nonetheless been found suddenly, inexplicably, incomprehensibly dead; and not every jetliner forced to attempt an emergency water landing will be lucky enough to have the legendary Chesley Sullenberger for a pilot.

Notwithstanding, 'free' and 'open' are not fungible, nor negotiable.

The internet has to be dangerous -- if it is really the Internet, the real Internet, and not just a walled garden, an infomercial, shopping network, reality tv, photo album, fancy telephone, ankle-bracelet, or, screen-saver.

The web-page I requested contains neither spoofed pages (phishing) nor code that seeks to infect or control my computer or my files (malware); this may, however, not be as easily able to be said of "you," whoever "you" are, since a) you appear to have created a page which is being given to me in lieu of the page in which, it seems, we both share a rather keen interest; and b) not only have you, at least for now, succeeded in preventing me from surfing according to my own will, but also c) it appears that the button enabling me to "opt out" of this 'protective' service is missing entirely, having been replaced by a cryptic, rather ominous assertion -- more warning, or threat, really, than helpful pointer -- concerning the close interconnectedness between my desire for un-'filtered' content and my relationship my sweet, honest, forthright ISP, Sonic.net, a tone which my many positive experiences to date would lead me to consider uncharacteristic and unwarranted.


I have set up this page at piratepad: http://piratepad.net/XWZrpiK4yF.

Please contact me there, if you would, to confirm receipt of this communication. Please feel free to comment or reply.


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